"The re-energized focus on Long Island Sound's story is obvious in the colorfully redesigned main hall, which has been renamed Newman's Own Hall in celebration of a $1.2 million grant from Newman's Own Foundation."

– The Norwalk Citizen

Exhibits & Animals

Blue Crab Fun Fact

Blue crabs are good swimmers. Their specially adapted pair of back legs are "swimmerets" that help move them effectively through the water.

"Flamingos"

Special Exhibit Open May 27 (Memorial Day Weekend) to Sept. 4 (Labor Day)

Aquarium Members Get In First!  

9-10 a.m. on Sat., May 27.  Members Only.  Free bagels, coffee and more. Please register so we can know to expect you. Call (203) 852-0700, ext. 2206.

Aquar.flamingo copy 3No bird may claim a cultural influence as big and long as the flamingo, and no place in Connecticut is featuring the big pink icons this summer except The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk.

A small flock, or “flamboyance,” of flamingos will be standing – often, on one leg – in the aviary on our riverfront courtyard from Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day.

The exhibit is free with Aquarium admission.

Ancient Egpytians are said to have used the flamingo to represent the reincarnation of their sun god. The birds have turned up in cave paintings in Spain and in ancient art of Peru. Alice used a flamingo as a croquet mallet when she went through the looking glass. And, of course, pink flamingos became a cultural icon of leisure and tropical travel in 1950s’ America … although today the image has evolved to represent hip high kitsch.

Displayed at The Maritime Aquarium will be six Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), a larger species – 4 to 5 feet tall – native to southern South America. They’re distinguished from other flamingo species by their paler plumage, by the downward half of their bills being black, and by their greyish legs with notably pink “knees.” (Although, technically, what looks like their knees are really their “ankles.”)

Chilean flamingos are considered to be “Near Threatened,” with humans representing their main threat because of hunting, egg harvesting and by the loss of – and changes to – their natural habitats.

The birds are on loan for the summer from a zoo in Louisiana.